Hailed as heroes, medical workers lend voices to George Floyd protests against racial injustice

AKDSEO

NEW YORK — Two healthcare workers knelt on the sidewalk along Brooklyn’s Atlantic Avenue and treated a large gash on a young man’s knee Friday afternoon. In his hands was a sign that read, “STOP KILLING BLACK PEOPLE”. He had fallen in a stampede to escape police breaking up a Times Square protest a few days before, but that hadn’t stopped him from coming out to this one. 

The crowd was large enough, long enough really, that even as the medical workers swabbed and re-wrapped his wound, a continuous stream of people flooded the streets, stopping traffic and chanting “Black Lives Matter.”

The good Samaritans in scrubs work at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Brooklyn Infusion Center. They didn’t come to the protest, the protest came to them. Hearing the cheers from the roving crowd, a group of employees emerged from the cancer facility to applaud the protesters. One of the nurses noticed the young man’s bandages needed replacing as he was marching past and sprung into action.

Afterward, he resumed the march and the healthcare workers returned to their offices. “That was so beautiful,” one of them said. 

A few hours later, just as New York has done every day

Read More

Medical workers use hero status to protest racial injustice

AKDSEO

NEW YORK — Two healthcare workers knelt on the sidewalk along Brooklyn’s Atlantic Avenue and treated a large gash on a young man’s knee Friday afternoon. In his hands was a sign that read, “STOP KILLING BLACK PEOPLE”. He had fallen in a stampede to escape police breaking up a Times Square protest a few days before, but that hadn’t stopped him from coming out to this one. 

The crowd was large enough, long enough really, that even as the medical workers swabbed and re-wrapped his wound, a continuous stream of people flooded the streets, stopping traffic and chanting “Black Lives Matter.”

The good Samaritans in scrubs work at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Brooklyn Infusion Center. They didn’t come to the protest, the protest came to them. Hearing the cheers from the roving crowd, a group of employees emerged from the cancer facility to applaud the protesters. One of the nurses noticed the young man’s bandages needed replacing as he was marching past and sprung into action.

Afterward, he resumed the march and the healthcare workers returned to their offices. “That was so beautiful,” one of them said. 

A few hours later, just as New York has done every day

Read More

Women in ICE custody plead for release amid pandemic

AKDSEO

The women detained at the for-profit jail in the small, rural town of Jena, Louisiana, hail from all corners of Latin America. Some are asylum-seekers who fled repressive regimes. Others are lawful U.S. permanent residents who were picked up by immigration authorities after serving time in prison. Some are mothers and even grandmothers. 

Right now, they’re all terrified.

Like many of the more than 35,000 immigrants currently in U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) custody, the women held at the LaSalle detention center in Jena feel powerless to shield themselves from the highly contagious coronavirus, which has killed more than 60,000 people worldwide, including more than 7,000 in the U.S. At least 370 people have died in Louisiana alone, where a recent surge in cases has threatened to overwhelm the state’s health care system.

With at least eight confirmed cases among detainees nationwide and six among detention center employees, ICE has come under intense pressure to drastically downsize its detainee population to mitigate the risk of outbreaks. 

But detainees and their advocates fear ICE isn’t acting quickly enough. Despite some releases, many of them compelled by a flurry of lawsuits, the agency has resisted calls to implement

Read More